Faculty & Staff

CTRP Faculty & Clinical Staff


Alicia F. Lieberman, Ph.D., Director

Chandra Ghosh Ippen, Ph.D., Dissemination Director

Miriam Hernandez Dimmler, Ph.D., Community Mental Health Initiative Director

Nancy C. Compton, Ph.D., Training Director

Laura M. Castro, LCSW, Psy.D.

Griselda Oliver Bucio, LMFT, Intake Coordinator

Vilma Reyes, Psy.D.

Markita Mays, LCSW

Ann Chu, Ph.D., Associate Dissemination Director

 

Administrative & Research Staff


Tuesday Ray, B.A., Program Administrator

Aru Gonzalez, M.Ed., Clinical Research Coordinator

Leah Sodowick, B.A., Research Associate

Christina Marquez, M.A., Dissemination Coordinator


 

Alicia F. Lieberman, Ph.D., Director

Alicia.Lieberman@ucsf.edu

See Dr. Lieberman's UCSF Faculty Webpage

Dr. Lieberman is the Irving B. Harris Endowed Chair in Infant Mental Health and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs at the UCSF Department of Psychiatry, and Director of the Child Trauma Research Program. She is a clinical consultant with the San Francisco Human Services Agency. She is active in major national organizations involved with mental health in infancy and early childhood. She is past-president of the board of directors of Zero to Three: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, and on the Professional Advisory Board of the Johnson & Johnson Pediatric Institute. She has served on peer review panels of the National Institute of Mental Health, is on the Board of Trustees of the Irving Harris Foundation, and consults with the Miriam and Peter Haas Foundation on early childhood education for Palestinian-Israeli children.

Born and raised in Paraguay, she received her BA from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. This background informs her work on behalf of children and families from diverse ethnic and cultural origins, with primary emphasis on the experiences of Latinos in the United States.

Dr. Lieberman is currently the director of the Early Trauma Treatment Network (ETTN), a collaborative of four university sites that include the UCSF/SFGH Child Trauma Research Program, Boston Medical Center, Louisiana State University Medical Center, and Tulane University. ETTN is funded by the federal Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) as part of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, a 40-site national initiative that has the mission of increasing the access and quality of services for children exposed to trauma in the United States. Her major interests include infant mental health, disorders of attachment, early trauma treatment outcome research, and mental health service disparities for underserved and minority children and families. Her current research involves treatment outcome evaluation of the efficacy of child-parent psychotherapy with trauma-exposed children aged birth to six and with pregnant women involved in domestic violence. As a trilingual, tricultural Jewish Latina, she has a special interest in cultural issues involving child development, child rearing, and child mental health. She lectures extensively on these topics nationally and internationally.

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Chandra Ghosh Ippen, Ph.D., Dissemination Director

chandra.ghosh@ucsf.edu

Dr. Ghosh Ippen is the Dissemination Director of the Child Trauma Research Program at the University of California, San Francisco and the Early Trauma Treatment Network, a member of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN). She has worked on seven longitudinal studies and has conducted treatment outcome research on the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention programs with Spanish-speaking children and parents. She is co-author of Losing a Parent to Death: Guidelines for the Treatment of Traumatic Bereavement in Infancy and Early Childhood (2003), director of the NCTSN Measure Review Database, and producer and director of Vale la Pena Recordar, a Spanish language video on childhood traumatic grief. As a first-generation East Indian/Japanese American, she is committed to examining how culture and context affect perception and mental health systems. She authored the chapter "The sociocultural context of infant mental health: Towards contextually congruent intervention," which is part of the 3rd edition of the Handbook of Infant Mental Health, and co-authored the chapter "Rainbow of tears, souls full of hope: Cultural issues related to young children and trauma," which discusses the importance of incorporating a cultural focus when working with young children who have experienced trauma. She serves as the co-chair of the Cultural Competence Consortium of the NCTSN.

In her spare time she bakes pies with her 11-year old son. She is on a mission to bake 1000 pies in her lifetime and a pie in each of the 50 states.

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Miriam Hernandez Dimmler, Ph.D., Community Mental Health Initiative Director

miriam.dimmler@ucsf.edu

Dr. Hernandez Dimmler coordinates community-based mental health outreach services and evaluation at the Child Trauma Research Program. Born and raised in New York City, she received her B.A. from Columbia College of Columbia University in New York where she majored in psychology and the biological sciences. She moved to the San Francisco Bay Area to complete her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in clinical science and community psychology. Her graduate training was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Chancellor's Opportunity Fellowship, Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowship and a UC Dissertation-year Fellowship. Her dissertation was titled "Parent Expectations, Knowledge of Student Performance, and School Involvement: Links to the Achievement of African American and Latino Children." Her predoctoral internship training was at the APA accredited Clinical Psychology Training Program in Public Service and Minority Mental Health at the University of California, San Francisco. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Community Academic Research Training Alliance at the University of California, San Francisco. During both her pre- and post-doctoral fellowships, she received clinical training in child-parent psychotherapy at the Child Trauma Research Program. Her research to date has focused on parenting qualities in relation to children's academic and social competencies, such as parenting factors that predict to achievement and cognitive gains in underserved, ethnic minority students from low-performing elementary schools. As a bi-cultural, bi-lingual Cuban-American from New York City, she is particularly invested in promoting urban children's socio-emotional and academic development through community and school-based preventions and interventions for low-income families.

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Nancy C. Compton, Ph.D., Training Director

nancy.compton@ucsf.edu

Dr. Compton is the Director of Training at the Child Trauma Research Program where she has worked since the program's inception in 1996. She teaches the assessment seminar and supervises trainees and also carries a caseload. Dr. Compton also provides psychological services to women and children at the Family Justice Center in Oakland, CA and has a private practice in the East Bay. Dr. Compton is on the board of Global Family Village, an initiative that establishes community based, family centered care for orphaned, abandoned and displaced children in Nepal. Previously, Dr. Compton was the Director of Research at the Whole Child Initiative, a project launched by Dr. Jane Goodall and Dr. Marion Wright Edelman with the mission of identifying and supporting model grassroots projects for women and children around the world. She has also been on the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, worked as a Child Development Specialist at the UCSF Infant Parent Program, a Domestic Violence Specialist for the Alameda County Superior Court and District Attorney's Office, and developed a center for pregnant and parenting Puerto Rican teenagers and their children in Massachusetts. Dr. Compton coauthored Losing a Parent to Death in the Early Years: Guidelines for the Treatment of Traumatic Bereavement in Infancy and Childhood was the author of African American Children who have Experienced Homelessness: Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience and coauthored a book on teenage pregnancy for the National Education Association. Dr. Compton's experience and expertise are in the areas of attachment, trauma, and loss.

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Laura M. Castro, LCSW, Psy.D.

laura.castro@ucsf.edu

Dr. Castro is a licensed clinical psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Psychiatry in the Child Trauma Research Program. Dr. Castro received her Psy.D. in clinical psychology from The Wright Institute in Berkeley, California. She has been a psychotherapist for over 25 years and currently serves as a staff psychologist and supervisor at CTRP working with traumatized children and their families, and providing supervision and consultation to social workers, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists. In addition, Laura maintains a private practice located in Oakland, California, where she provides consultation, clinical assessments, and treatment to young children through adolescence and their families. Born in Phoenix, Arizona, Dr. Castro is bicultural and provides clinical services in Spanish and English. Her strong commitment to serving culturally diverse and disenfranchised/underserved populations is driven by both her own experiences as a Chicana and her professional training in settings focusing on culture, socioeconomic status, and mental health. 

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Griselda Oliver Bucio, LMFT, Intake Coordinator

griselda.oliver@ucsf.edu

Griselda Oliver Bucio, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, was born and raised in Mexico City. She graduated in 1998 from Iberoamericana University in Mexico City with a degree in Clinical Psychology. She received post-graduate training in Infant Psychopathology from the Department of Clinical Psychology at the University of Paris, through the Remote Education Program. After immigrating to the United States, she obtained her Master's degree in Clinical Psychology from San Francisco State University. Griselda is a bilingual/bicultural Consultant, Staff Clinician, Supervisor, and CPP Trainer at the Child Trauma Research Program within the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where she has been a staff member since 2005. She has previous experience working with adults and adolescents, as well as children and families in individual, family, and group psychotherapy modalities. She also has specialized experience working with pregnant women exposed to domestic violence (DV), and with trauma-exposed young children and their families. She provides consultation and facilitates groups for mothers and young children within DV shelter settings. Griselda is a member of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network's (NCTSN) Translations Review Committee, and she is the co-producer and director of the video "Vale la pena recordar," a Spanish translation and adaptation of a video for caregivers of children who have experienced traumatic loss. Her major interests include infant mental health, the impact of early trauma within the dyadic relationship and pregnancy, disorders of attachment; the effects of paternal absence, and the process of immigration in Latino families. As a Mexican immigrant, she is committed to working with culturally diverse communities. Griselda currently serves as the intake coordinator for CTRP.

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Vilma Reyes, Psy.D.

vilma.reyes@ucsf.edu

Dr. Vilma Reyes is a licensed clinical psychologist who provides Child-Parent Psychotherapy, training and supervision and coordinates community-based mental health outreach services and evaluation funded by the Tipping Point Community, at the University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry in the Child Trauma Research Program. She has over 11 years of clinical experience providing relationship-focused, culturally-informed interventions for trauma-exposed young children and their families. Dr. Reyes is Latina and specializes in working with Spanish speaking immigrant families.

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Markita Mays, LCSW

markita.mays@ucsf.edu

Markita Mays, LCSW is on staff at the UCSF/SFGH Child Trauma Research Program as Clinical Social Worker. As staff, Markita provides clinical supervision, facilitates the Trauma and Multicultural Seminar, and is a Trainer for the dissemination of Child-Parent Psychotherapy. As a liaison with the Tipping Point Community Mental Health Initiative, Markita provides mental health services, consultation and support services at community-based partnership programs, Center for Youth Wellness, Bayview Child Health Center, and The Children’s Advocacy Center.
Markita earned her BA in Human Biology at Brown University, with an emphasis on African American Studies. She graduated with her Master’s degree in Social Work, focusing on Children, Youth, and Families from California State University, East Bay. Her graduate practicum trainings were completed at East Bay Agency for Children’s Therapeutic Nursery School and Early Intervention Services at Children’s Hospital, Oakland. She later received two years of post-graduate clinical training at the UCSF/SFGH Child Trauma Research Program.
 
In addition to direct service and clinical training, Markita has pursued advocacy on behalf of children of incarcerated parents. She is the co-Founder of the Alameda County Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership (ACCIPP), which is a regional coalition focused on those who work with or are concerned about children of incarcerated parents. In her work with ACCIPP, she served as a consultant with Sesame Street on the development and implementation of their toolkit and resources, Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration. Markita has also guest lectured on the topic of children of incarcerated parents for many audiences and systems, including the Zero to Three National Training Institute in 2012 and 2013.
 
As an African American, Markita is committed to understanding the intersection and intergenerational patterns of race and trauma for African American families and communities. She co-authored an article titled, Mommy Hates Daddy: A Child-Parent Psychotherapy Story of Engagement, Domestic Violence, and Intergenerational Ghosts, in Zero To Three’s Journal, and worked with CJM Associates on a group curriculum titled, Healing Trauma and Overcoming Stress, specifically targeting African American parents and grandparents raising children.
 
 
 

Ann Chu, Ph.D., Associate Dissemination Director 

ann.chu@ucsf.edu

Ann Chu, Ph.D., joins the Dissemination Team at the Child Trauma Research Program as part of the Early Trauma Treatment Network (ETTN), within the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN). As part of the Dissemination Team, she collaborates with CPP Trainers to create tools that enhance the dissemination of CPP to wider populations and systems (e.g., military families, child welfare, pediatrics).

Dr. Chu received her BS in psychology from the University of Richmond and her PhD in clinical child psychology at the University of Denver. She also completed her predoctoral internship training and postdoctoral fellowship with the Clinical Psychology Training Program at the University of California, San Francisco, where she received training in CPP at the Child Trauma Research Program. Her research examines how trauma impacts vulnerable populations (e.g., young children, youth in foster care, childhood sexual abuse survivors).

Prior to rejoining CTRP, she was a faculty member at the University of Denver Psychology Department. When she returned to the Bay Area, she took a position as Program Director at A Better Way, a Bay Area-based non-profit providing community-based mental health and parent support services to children and families involved in the child welfare system. As an immigrant from Taiwan, she has focused a significant part of her career studying and working with families from minority and disadvantaged backgrounds. She is also dedicated to bringing evidence-based treatment approaches to community mental health service providers in order to improve access to quality care for families from all backgrounds.

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Administrative & Research Staff


Tuesday Ray, Program Administrator

tuesday.ray@ucsf.edu

Aru Gonzalez, Clinical Research Coordinator

aru.gonzalez@ucsf.edu

Leah Sodowick, Research Associate

leah.sodowick@ucsf.edu

Christina Marquez, Dissemination Coordinator

christina.marquez@ucsf.edu

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